All posts in “conflict resolution”

Advanced Peer Support Facilitation Training

On Friday April 24th the Self-Help Resource Centre provided its first Advanced Peer Support Facilitation Training to a full house. This training builds on the fundamental concepts explored in the Introductory Training such as the role of the facilitator, how to use a comfort agreement, how to work with conflict in a group, and facilitation skills development. The advanced training starts off like a peer support group with introductions/check in, group objectives and agenda, and the creation of group guidelines/comfort agreement, with an emphasis on using strengths-based language and communication. The training continues with opportunities for peer leaders to bring their experience to the group and explore facilitator ethics, effective communication, tension, conflict, etc. There is also an opportunity to practice facilitation and build personal facilitator skills, such as mindful listening, self-compassion, self and group care, and more.

After completing the Intro and Advanced trainings, participants are welcome to join our monthly community of practice on the first Thursday of the month. This monthly meeting creates a space for peer leaders to get support from other peer leaders, share valuable resources and experiences, learn and develop professional skills, and brainstorm solutions to ongoing challenges in the field. Please note:

Next Intro Training: TBA
Next Advance Training: TBA
Next Community of Practice: TBA

Contact:  416-487-4355 or email registration@selfhelp.on.ca

Participant Feedback:

“Lovely to reconnect with others from the first training”

“What I liked the most and found most useful was the experience of facilitating a group and the information about how to deal with challenges in the groups, diffusing tension and conflicts.”

“It was great and a lot of fun”

“Thank you for all your hard work, support and encouragement”

“What I liked most was the atmosphere”

“Networking was the most useful and I like the facilitation practice the most”

“Good Session!!”

“The facilitation practice was the most useful, as it was great to put what we learned into practice and to get feedback for improvement”

“Thank you. I am happy to find my questions answered and I feel confident that I invested in my recovery”

“Feeling great!!!”

“What I liked most and found most useful was the openness and exchange of ideas”

“What I liked most was the people I met”

“Great work!”

“It was a great group”

“What was most useful was the insight into your own triggers and stressors and actions to take”

“The kindness and respect shared by everyone was most useful”

Introduction Peer Support Facilitator Training

On Friday February 27th the SHRC provided its second out of multiple trainings on how to facilitate a peer support group. The high demand from the community has inspired us to offer more trainings in the coming months. The introductory training is a peer support group in itself. It starts off with introductions/check in, group objectives & agenda, and the creation of group guidelines/comfort agreement including how to talk about conflict in a group, the peer facilitator role, and boundaries. The training continues with peer support perspectives in mental health, a personal facilitator skills inventory, and individual action plans for next steps in starting a group. It concludes with a mindfulness practice and check out.

After completion of the intro training, participants are welcome to sign up for the advanced training where we will dive deeper into facilitator skill development and group challenges.

Participant feedback:

“Thank you this was worth a Friday at 10am and in Toronto where I travel 2 hours to get here!!”
“Thank you knowledgeable people and Houselink is a comfortable happy setting.”
“What was most useful was the good, solid content and picking up energy and inspiration from individuals and the whole group.”
“What I liked most was the group discussion and the facilitators were willing to help.”
“The collaborative group/class work was insightful and engaging.”
“What I found most useful was evaluating our own facilitation skills/abilities and how simple it is to start a group.”
“Very welcoming environment. I felt comfortable, safe and enjoyed the snacks/beverages.”
“Very well presented, participation was encouraged.”
“The most useful was the action plan to start a group and the contacts I made.”
“Very rewarding experience.”
“Going through the group action plan was most useful. Breaking it down helped to operationalize my own action plan.”
“What I liked most was learning what I could do to resolve conflict.”
“Really awesome. Thank you!”

Agincourt Community Services Association – Eviction-Prevention Harm Reduction Program

Group Name: Agincourt Community Services Association – Eviction-Prevention Harm Reduction Program

Description: Today, ACSA (Agincourt Community Services Association) addresses a variety of issues including systemic poverty, hunger, housing, homelessness, unemployment, accessibility and social isolation. Over the years ACSA has been funded by all levels of government, several foundations, schools, local faith communities, and The United Way of Greater Toronto. Its strength remains in the original concept: To act as a bridge between people who need help and those who can provide it.

The Evictions-Prevention Harm Reduction Worker (EPHR worker) will provide short-term case management to clients at risk of or experiencing eviction due to substance use. The EPHR worker will be mobile and assist clients in the community with:

  • Mediation and/conflict resolution with landlords, neighbours and roommates,
  • Housing searches,
  • Tenant’s rights advocacy (e.g. Landlord & Tenant Board applications, mediation and hearings),
  • Referrals and accompaniments for mental health and addictions based appointments
    Financial management skills.

The worker will provide in-home harm reduction counseling in order to develop appropriate and effective techniques that will be relevant to the client’s lifestyle, specifically geared towards housing retention.

Where: 4155 Sheppard Avenue East, Suite 100 | Toronto, ON M1S 1T4

When: Gitanjali is in the office and out in the community on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays. She checks email and telephone voice mails regularly.

Contact: Gitanjali Lena 416-321-6912 Ext. 225 | Mobile 416-684-6352 | 416-321-6912 | lgitanjali@agincourtcommunityservices.com | info@agincourtcommunityservices.com | www.agincourtcommunityservices.com

Peer Support Group Facilitation Training

On Friday January 30th the SHRC provided its first out of multiple trainings on how to facilitate a peer support group. The high demand from the community has inspired us to offer 2 more rounds of the introductory training and 2 rounds of the advanced. The introductory training is a peer support group in itself. It starts off with a walking group (weather permitting), introductions/check in, group objectives & agenda, and the creation of group guidelines/comfort agreement including how to talk about conflict in a group, the peer facilitator role, and boundaries. The training continues with peer support perspectives in mental health, a personal facilitator skills inventory, and individual action plans for next steps in starting a group. It concludes with a mindfulness practice and check out.

After completion of the intro training, participants are welcome to sign up for the advanced training where we will dive deeper into facilitator skill development and group challenges.

Participant feedback:

“Very helpful and relevant.”
“It was a great experience I learned a lot.”
“This workshop is exactly what I needed to go forward to my next step.”
“I like the skills building aspect that emphasizes organizing a peer program.”
“I liked that the attendees were a diverse bunch especially in their reasons for taking the training. I liked the location and the time it ended. I liked the two breaks we had because it gave me an opportunity to get fresh air and stretch my legs.”
“It was encouraging to realize that the action of peer-facilitation is becoming more widely accepted.”

Volunteer testimonials:

“Participating in the facilitator training was an excellent learning opportunity, as a placement student at SHRC. I feel the most useful and practical skill taught in this training was how to to negate conflict within a group. Having participated in a few groups and facilitated one, I have learned that conflict is inevitable; there will always be a difference of opinion and values that are brought to each group due to the natural diversity and variation within our communities. This exact notion of differing worldviews was also brought to the forefront in the training, demonstrating the importance of discourses within the context of comparing a medicalized model of mental health versus an everyday account of mental health. It was further explained that often times these differing and conflicting perspectives is the source of much conflict within groups. Therefore, understanding where our counterparts situate themselves within these discourses is imperative to resolving conflict. The style in which the training was taught was very useful as a participant interested in improving their skills as a peer support facilitator. The entirety of the training was organized similar as to how a support group should run from beginning to the end including some of the following; introductions, check-in’s, agenda and objectives, creating a comfort agreement, a series of topics, mindfulness and a check-out process. This set-up of the training was useful in understanding how a group should run within direct practice and further allowed the participants to take away a practical skill to implement within their own work. Also, the use of activities and post-it notes was my favourite part of the training. Often times, day trainings tends to become a lecture-style format in which all the participants are sitting and listening to the presenter while a slide show runs in the background. Having activities to do with all the participants, at your individual table and also in pairs, avoided this earlier fear and allowed for active engagement without getting bored or distracted. Lastly, the post-it notes were useful because it incorporated a visual and artistic component to the training, that is often lacking in other more traditional types of training.” ~ Caitlin Keating

“Assisting, as well as participating in the SHRC’s peer support group facilitation training, was an invaluable experience. I was fortunate enough to have the opportunity to help with some preparation for the group as well as being able to help others with their action plans. Making the action plans was very enjoyable and productive. Developing them lead to much needed direction and motivation to begin facilitating our own groups. The training content was detailed and very informative. The input from many of the participants regarding their past experiences in groups, discussing what worked and what didn’t, positively added to the discussion. The extensive facilitation experience of the SHRC’s peer support training facilitator, was very apparent with the level of knowledge she demonstrated and shared with the group. I found the peer support training to be extremely worthwhile and beneficial.” ~ Tammy Clayton

Arab Community Centre of Toronto – Domestic Abuse Education Project

Group Name: Arab Community Centre of Toronto – Domestic Abuse Education Project

Description: The Arab Community Centre of Toronto (ACCT) is a non for profit organization with charitable status, and is non-political and non-sectarian. The ACCT is proud to be a focal point for all Arab and non-Arab communities in which they can find an outlet for settlement and social services inquiries. We serve newcomers of all cultures, religions and ethnicities.

The Domestic Abuse Education project’s aim is to raise awareness regarding violence against women, elders and children and to educate clients about the effects of violence and inform them about better ways of dealing with conflict.

This past year, we noticed an increase of domestic violence cases. We had quite a few cases that were referred to us by the Police Victim Services, Social Services, LINC schools and probation Officers. Fortunate enough we were able to prevent a few cases from escalating, especially cases that were brought to our attention before being reported to the police. Counseling was a great help in many of these cases.

Where: 555 Burnhamthorpe Road, Suite 209 | Etobicoke, ON M9C 2Y3

When: Please call for more information on location and times.

Contact: 416-231-7746 | info@arabnewcomers.org | www.arabcommunitycentre.com

Afghan Women’s Organization – Support for Youth

Group Name: Afghan Women’s Organization – Support for Youth

Description: Afghan Women’s Organization (AWO) first opened its doors to address the needs of Afghan women living in Ontario. AWO began by offering English training and settlement services for newly arrived Afghan women. Not only have we significantly expanded these particular services, but have also considerably broadened the scope of our projects and programs. Currently, the AWO’s various projects and programs are assisting hundreds of Afghan refugees immigrate to Canada; helping ease the settlement process for many new immigrants in Ontario; providing resources to find employment and training opportunities; offering psychological support; and creating individual and group counseling for families, seniors and youth.

The AWO youth program is mandated to assist Youth in all aspects of adaption and integration into Canadian society through culturally-competent and linguistically –appropriate services and programs. We also provide services that are innovative and responsive to newcomer youth needs. Our program works collectively to engage youth and provide services that are creative, innovative and welcoming.

Who we serve:
The AWO Youth Program serves all Afghan Youth ages 14-29 that live in Toronto and peel region
The program has a special focus on newcomer youth and youth who are at risk
We also work in collaboration with families, and other organizations to address the needs of newcomer youth.

Where: 789 Don Mills Rd., # 700 | Toronto, ON M3C 1T5

When: Please call for more information on location and times.

Contact: 416-588-3585 | ageneral@afghanwomen.org | www.afghanwomen.org

Afghan Women’s Organization – Family Support

Group Name: Afghan Women’s Organization – Family Support

Description: Afghan Women’s Organization (AWO) first opened its doors to address the needs of Afghan women living in Ontario. AWO began by offering English training and settlement services for newly arrived Afghan women. Not only have we significantly expanded these particular services, but have also considerably broadened the scope of our projects and programs. Currently, the AWO’s various projects and programs are assisting hundreds of Afghan refugees immigrate to Canada; helping ease the settlement process for many new immigrants in Ontario; providing resources to find employment and training opportunities; offering psychological support; and creating individual and group counseling for families, seniors and youth.

Family Support
Through counselling and education, the AWO’s Family Crisis Support Program helps families within the Afghan community resolve domestic issues. The program’s approach to addressing conflicts and crisis within the families is influenced by their understanding of cultural norms and values within Afghan society. The Family Crisis Support program works with shelters, the police, and the court system to provide counseling and education on:

  • Spousal Abuse
  • Child Abuse
  • Child Neglect
  • Conflict Resolution

There are also information sessions on conflict resolution techniques, improving communication between partners, improving communication with children, and improving communication among siblings. Counselling sessions are arranged to help families address and resolve intra-family issues. The counselling sessions are strictly confidential and culturally competent. *Services are provided in Dari, Pashto, Farsi, Urdu, Hindi, Punjabi and English.

Where: 789 Don Mills Rd., # 700 | Toronto, ON M3C 1T5

When: Please call for more information on location and times.

Contact: 416-588-3585 | ageneral@afghanwomen.org | www.afghanwomen.org

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